Album Reviews, Music

Classic Album Review: Arctic Monkeys – Favourite Worst Nightmare

Arctic Monkeys’ sophomore release signified not only everything we already knew was great about the band, but also what would go on to make them great in the future. They had longevity in abundance.

Released on 23rd April 2007, Favourite Worst Nightmare is the second album from Sheffield born band Arctic Monkeys; who just a year previously had shook the music world with their record breaking and era-defining debut album Whatever People Say I Am, That’s What I’m Not. The success of that album worked as a double-edged sword for the band coming into this release, because not only did it have to match the quality of such a fantastic album, it also had to show signs of growth and development as artists.

I think what I love most about this album is the fine tuning put into mixing and production, as well as the obvious influences that pour through the music. There is of course that brash and loud side that we heard from the debut, but we also get lots of crisp and slick shoegaze guitar riffs, particularly in songs like If You Were There, Beware and 505. Arctic Monkeys arrived with the debut, what they did with this album was unpack their bags and move in.

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The critical reception of this album proved to us all that Arctic Monkeys were no flash in the pan, they were here to stay and had brought out a follow-up album that was so good it could brush shoulders with some of the greats of it’s time. Favourite Worst Nightmare was nominated for the 2007 Mercury Prize and won Best British Album at the 2008 BRIT Awards. Anyone who was anyone gave this album full marks and acknowledged the band’s importance in indie rock resurgence.

Commercially it was a thrillride too, selling 85,000 copies in the first 24 hours of release and going on to amass first week sales of 220,000; they had outsold the entire top 20 combined by themselves. All twelve songs on the track list made it into the top 200 singles, despite only releasing one single alongside it’s release. Both Brianstorm and Fluorescent Adolescent went on top of the UK Singles Chart at different points across the year and the band were met with huge responsibility after that; going onto to headline Glastonbury festival just 12 months after releasing their debut.

Arctic Monkeys’ sophomore release signified not only everything we already knew was great about the band, but also what would go on to make them great in the future. They had longevity in abundance. Some of the truly great indie tracks of our generation come straight from this album and to deny it’s legacy would be The Bad Thing to do. So Do Me A Favour, if This House Is A Circus then put on your Balaclava and blast this album loud, you won’t be the Only Ones Who Know how good this album is, trust me.

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